Producers meet to debate changes facing agriculture at AFA’s 2019 AGM

AFA-Room & LynnAt the AFA Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Leduc on January 17, 2019, producers, industry partners and representatives from several agricultural organizations gathered together to discuss current issues facing Alberta producers like grain transportation, carbon sequestering, public trust and farm labour.

Farm-saved seed proposal a highlighted issue at the AGM

In addition to these issues, a special panel was assembled to explore in greater detail the new proposed varietal funding models for farm-saved seed in Canada. The federal government, in conjunction with the seed industry and the Grains Roundtable, have proposed two models for a royalty on farm-saved seed – either an end-point royalty or a trailing royalty.

Attendees at the AFA AGM heard more about the background of these two royalty options, how other countries are handling funding for new seed varieties, and specifics about what is being proposed. Producers heard from a panel of experts including Holly Mayer with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Todd Hydra with SeCan, Dr. Richard Gray with University of Saskatchewan and Kevin Bender, Chair of the Alberta Wheat Commission.

 “The issue of royalties on seed is one piece of policy our organization has been watching and working on for years,” says AFA President Lynn Jacobson, who farms near Enchant. “Recently, new consultations and proposed changes have moved it into the spotlight for us and for many Canadian crop producers. At the AGM, we brought in these presenters to help explain what the changes are, how the current options were arrived at and what’s next for this issue.”

Jacobson explained that AFA’s Board of Directors had been hearing from producers that more consultation was wanted on this issue, with the hope that different options around royalties on farm-saved seed could be explored.

At the AGM, Holly Mayer confirmed that there have been no final decisions made on the two proposed options currently on the table for farm-saved seed, and that producers still have an opportunity to share their thoughts on this issue at meetings like the AFA AGM.

AFA-Seed Panel

AFA Seed Panel “Seed For Thought: An Examination of Canada’s Crop Varietal Research Funding”. L-R Kevin Bender with Alberta Wheat, Todd Hyra with SeCan, Holly Mayer with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Richard Gray with University of Saskatchewan and AFA moderator Director Humphrey Banack.

Provincial update from Alberta’s Agriculture Minister

The Hon. Oneil Carlier, Alberta’s Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, attended the meeting and provided a provincial update for the producers at the meeting.

Oneil Carlier then met with Lakeland College agricultural students for a break out question-and-answer ‘bear pit’ session with discussions covering a wide range of topics including preserving grassland, the carbon tax, Alberta’s offset protocols, energy efficiency programs, rural crime and more.

Resolutions and debate on advocacy issues

The AGM is also a time for AFA members to propose, debate and vote on resolutions that deal with issues that affect Alberta farm producers.

AFA-Board ReportDuring the AGM, members discussed, voted on and passed the following resolutions:

AFA will explore alternative proposals for funding varietal research: BE IT RESOLVED that AFA work with like-minded farm organizations and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) to develop alternative proposals for funding varietal research that will be equitable and satisfactory to both producers and seed varietal breeders but that will ensure a strong public varietal research presence.

AFA will press for renewed funding for a tree nursery program: BE IT RESOLVED that AFA, through CFA, continue to pressure the Federal Government to restore funding for a tree nursery program.

AFA will advocate for compensation to producers for historical carbon sequestering: BE IT RESOLVED that Canada incorporate into the National Inventory the historic efforts of Canadian farmers in reducing carbon emissions and storing carbon by identifying and incorporating these incremental changes subsequent to 1990.

AFA will recommend a regulation change for Fusarium head blight in Alberta: BE IT RESOLVED that Fusarium head blight be removed from the Agricultural Pest Act in Alberta and be placed under the Agricultural Pest and Nuisance Control Regulations.

AFA will assist in the development of a standardized Canadian grain contract: BE IT RESOLVED that the AFA supports the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan in their effort to develop a standardized grain contract.

AFA delegates also re-confirmed the Board of Directors for another year, with a mandate to continue engagement on their vital policy advocacy alongside Canada’s provincial and national farm organizations on matters such as agricultural plastics recycling, farm labour solutions, trade agreements and more.

AFA-Lynn WrapAs Alberta’s general farm organization, one of AFA’s areas of expertise is agricultural policy. AFA’s President Jacobson says that’s why it’s important to discuss these issues at the AGM and set the direction for the coming year.

“We deal with concerns that impact a wide range of issues for farmers and ranchers in the province,” he says. “We will continue to raise the awareness on these issues and challenges to make sure our Alberta producers have a voice in these important policy decisions.”

Look to AFA’s AGM for information on critical changes in agriculture for 2019

AFA’s Board and Executive will join AFA members and guests in Leduc, Alberta for the organization’s Annual General Meeting on January 16-17, 2019, with an eye toward getting producers’ input on some complex issues facing agriculture today.

AFA-AGM2018-1AFA President Lynn Jacobson points to three issues that currently have the potential to impact producers in a way they may not want. He says it’s not too late for Alberta producers to get involved in these issues, and the AFA AGM is a perfect place to start.

 Updates to Plant Breeders’ Rights legislation

“An issue AFA’s been involved with for about three years is Plant Breeders’ Rights,” says Jacobson. “The federal government is in the consultation phase of implementing changes around royalties paid for farm-saved seed, and it’s very important that producers understand what’s being proposed.”

As Jacobson explains, after years of discussions, the federal government is considering two options for changing seed royalties through either an end-point royalty or a trailing royalty. Although the recommendations came out of discussions with the seed sector and plant breeders, that doesn’t mean these are the only ways forward. Jacobson insists that producers still have a chance to speak out and propose other options, but the time has come to be heard.

“There is an opportunity for other options if producers want that, but they’re going to have to be vocal about it,” explains Jacobson. “If they don’t get involved soon, this will just become a reality they’ll have to live with, without having a say.”

Jacobson points out this is precisely why it’s important for AFA members to attend the organization’s AGM: to be updated on critical developments in agriculture and to have a voice on these kinds of issues.

At the AFA AGM in Leduc on January 17, members will hear presentations on a variety of subjects, and vote on resolutions. Producers in attendance impact policy and opportunities in agriculture for the coming year. That’s because the resolutions agreed upon at the AGM are passed along to policy makers in government and within provincial and national agriculture organizations.

Jacobson says that as a general farm organization, AFA covers issues that touch every part of the industry, from agricultural plastics to grain transportation and seed. He notes two other emerging topics will be discussed at the AGM that he feels should be on Alberta producers’ radar: grain transportation and potential changes to the Canadian Grain Commission.

Bill C-69 and the Trans Mountain Pipeline

iStock_000019270898medThe oil industry isn’t the only one feeling the effects of delays in the Trans Mountain pipeline. Many agriculture groups are concerned that using the railway as an alternative transportation system for crude oil shipments will create undue stress for the agriculture industry, which is already dealing with a filled-to-capacity rail system.

Over the last several years, there have been issues getting agricultural products to market on Canada’s rail system in a timely manner. Bill C-69 introduced by the federal government in February 2018 could cause additional delays that may result in increased traffic on Canada’s railways. AFA wants the interests of the agriculture industry to remain a key part of this conversation. This topic will be explored at the AGM in January 2019.

Canadian Grain Commission changes on the horizon

In early-October 2018, an Agri-Food Economic Strategy Table Report concluded that changes are needed for how the Canadian Grain Commission regulates Canada’s grain industry if the industry is to remain competitive. The report suggested that the Canada Grain Act be ‘modernized’ to remove duplicate services currently performed by the Canadian Grain Commission plus review the wheat class system to take into account market realities.

These recommendations will begin rolling out in 2019. Jacobson notes this issue will be on the AGM agenda so that producers can be made aware of the potential impact of these changes.

 Being an AFA member means producers can create change

AFA invites all interested producers to attend the AGM, but only members can submit and vote on resolutions for these important issues. If a producer wants to help set the priorities and direction for AFA’s policy efforts in 2019, it all begins at the AGM.

Becoming an AFA member is easy – just sign up online here. For producers, the membership cost is only $150 per year, or just over $12 a month, and comes with many benefits. Once you have your AFA membership, register online for the AFA Annual General Meeting on January 17,  2019 in Leduc.

AFA-AGM2018-OneilCarlierThe AGM will include presentations from AFA and industry as well as a provincial update from the Hon. Oneil Carlier, Alberta’s Minister of Agriculture and Forestry. A President’s Reception takes place on the evening of January 16 to kick off the meeting.

Jacobson says AFA would love to see producers of all kinds in attendance at the AGM, whether they grow crops, raise livestock or produce value-added food. Afterall, he points out, if AFA doesn’t hear from those producers affected by these issues, it’s hard to fight for what producers want.

“We sometimes get a low turnout at the AGM, and we often hear farmers are frustrated when they feel changes are made without their input,” notes Jacobson. “This is an opportunity to become a member of our organization, spend the day with us and be part of the change you want to see.”

Join AFA today for great benefits and a voice in AG policy

With benefits that include significant discounts for insurance, vehicles, travel costs and farm safety courses, an AFA membership offers great value for Alberta producers and agribusinesses.

We’ve streamlined our membership pricing, so producers in Alberta pay only $150 a year for an AFA membership, while commodity organizations, non-profits, businesses and/or co-operatives that serve the needs and interests of agricultural producers pay only $500 per year.

Not only will you or your company get access to great benefits, but if you have an interest in shaping agricultural policy in the province, this is the place to be. As an AFA member, you’ll have a chance to vote on policy decisions that impact agriculture and participate in helping to set the direction of our organization each January at our annual general meeting.

AFA Member Benefits

iStock_000010421895MediumCheck out these AFA membership benefits from our corporate partners that – when used – will earn your AFA membership fees back in no time:

  • significant Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA Canada) fleet discounts on new vehicles, which can translate into savings of thousands of dollars
  • enhance your farm insurance coverage from The Co-operators Insurance for a fraction of the retail price
  • AFA members also receive discounts on farm, home and travel insurance from The Co-operators Insurance
  • NEW AFA Travel Discount Program gives members an exclusive worldwide travel discount service, saving you an average of 10-20% below-market price on all hotels and car rental suppliers around the world – anywhere, anytime. We’ll negotiate the best deals and provide a comparison price for you
  • save between 10-20% on St. John Ambulance’s public rates for first aid classes and get a special discount on their ‘Safety on the Farm’ module
  • members receive 10% off purchases made at Mark’s Work Wearhouse

AFA producer members (active or retired commercial agricultural producers, farming partners, or farming corporations) also receive these additional benefits:

  • special consideration for yourself or a family member for AFA’s annual $500 scholarship for post-secondary studies in agriculture or a related field at universities and colleges throughout Alberta
  • a $150 discount on a new one-year Farmers of North America (FNA) membership; a $400 discount on a new three-year FNA membership; a $650 discount on a new five-year FNA membership.

Agriculture Advocacy

AFA has been busy working on many developments in agriculture both provincially and federally this year. We advocate broadly for agriculture, not just for one group or commodity. Whether at the regional, provincial or national level, we represent our members on these producer-related agricultural issues:

  • trade and taxation
  • transportation and infrastructure
  • grain movement, grading and handling
  • plant breeding
  • energy, carbon capture and storage
  • surface rights
  • water-related risk
  • animal care
  • labour and employment standards
  • agricultural safety
  • business risk management

“We’re always looking for new and returning members who are passionate about agriculture,” says Shannon Scofield, Executive Director of AFA. “We are a collaborative organization that wants input from Alberta’s farm and ranch producers, commodity groups, agri-business and anyone who wants to have a say in how agriculture will develop and grow in Alberta and across Canada. There’s never been a better time to become an AFA member.”

AFA AGM- Farm Meeting

Signing up for an AFA membership is easy!

AFA’s annual membership year runs from November 1st to October 31st.  You can join online in minutes or download and print your application form by visiting our website: http://www.afaonline.ca/membership. A summary of benefits is listed below.

AFA Membership grid 2018

AFA Summer Meeting: a chance to discuss challenges and opportunities in agriculture

The Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) will hold their 2018 Summer Meeting on June 26 and 27, 2018 in Camrose, Alberta.

AFA Members – and those interested in agricultural policy – are invited to attend the working session on June 26 to participate in discussions about the emerging issues that will most affect farmers in the coming year. There will also be a presentation on sustainable agriculture.

AFA AGM- Farm Meeting2AFA Director Humphrey Banack says he always looks forward to challenging debate and discussion when those passionate about agriculture get together.

“During the AGM, we gather with producers to debate and discuss top issues in agriculture, then use those policy directions to draw the future of agriculture forward,” says Banack. “The June Summer Meeting is an important way to check in on how we’re doing for the year and discuss emerging issues that have developed since January.”

After the day of discussions on June 26, the meeting will conclude with a networking barbeque to give those in attendance an opportunity to connect with each other and share good food, good company and discuss issues in agriculture in a more informal way.

Here’s the agenda for the Tuesday, June 26, 2018 meeting:

10 am – noon:  Issue Update & Policy Development: What AFA has been up to this year

Noon: Lunch at Camrose Resort Casino

1 – 3 pm: Discussion on the top emerging issues facing our industry in the coming year

3 – 3:15 pm: Break

3:15 – 4:30 pm: Sustainable Agriculture Panel

4:30 – 5 pm: Issue/Debate Wrap Up

5:30 pm: Steak BBQ at the Park Pavilion, Camrose Exhibition Trail RV Park

On Wednesday, June 27, AFA will hold their regularly-scheduled board meeting, of which AFA Regional Directors and former AFA board members are welcome to attend.

Please RSVP for this event so we can assess attendance and plan for our barbeque. Contact AFA’s Executive Director Shannon Scofield by email at shannon.scofield@afaonline.ca, or call us toll-free at 1-855-789-9151 or contact the AFA Director in your area.

afa-humphrey-banack-farm-safetyHumphrey Banack, who farms near Camrose, Alberta, reminds producers that it’s never been more important to speak up and drive agricultural policy decisions. He stresses that meetings like this are a direct channel for producers to let their voice be heard.

“At AFA, our people are working for a stronger industry for all,” says Banack. “Past discussions like this have laid the foundation for some significant changes in agriculture. It’s great to know you can have such an impact at a grassroots level.”

Farm Safety Update

Marion Popkin, an Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) Director since 2012, says agriculture safety is her personal mission. She’s passionate about advocating for improved farm safety, and attends industry meetings to keep current.

afa-casa-meeting-octoberPopkin recently attended the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA) Annual General Meeting in Prince Edward Island in October (pictured here in the yellow jacket). The meeting put her in touch with new research and resources to share with others concerned about farm safety in Alberta.

“There is so much research going on with agricultural safety, and so many seriously bright people working on this issue,” Popkin says. “One of the challenges, though, is getting this information out to organizations that can help make a difference.”

Popkin points to two initiatives presented at the meeting. These safety solutions address two of agriculture’s most pressing safety challenges: children’s welfare and roll overs.

1. The National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

Popkin was thrilled to hear about this organization’s guidelines for adults who assign farm tasks to children aged 7 to 16 years. The guidelines are based on an understanding of childhood development, agricultural practices, principles of childhood injury, and agricultural and occupational safety.

“The age-appropriate guidelines are voluntary, but incredibly helpful because they are specific to agriculture, which can have many unique scenarios,” Popkin says. “The information deals with the competency of children based on their age, weight and height. So many of the questions we have are answered, and it’s available online for free.”

2. Roll Over Protection

According to Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre, farm machine roll overs cause the highest number of agricultural deaths in the province. Rollover Protection Structures (ROPS), in the form of roll bars or cages, are available for farm machines but can be expensive or hard to find, especially for older tractors.

At the meeting, Popkin discovered that the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) helps farmers source after-market structures. She also heard that Agrivita Canada Inc. is helping to create low-cost plans for farmers with basic welding skills to build and install their own ROPS. The Agrivita project aims to provide an alternative to the high cost of retrofitting tractors with ROPS.

“These meetings not only deliver great information, they provide opportunities for partnerships for AFA,” says Popkin. “Farm safety has long been a key area for AFA. It’s great to hear about workable, practical solutions that we can share for the benefit of our farm communities.”

Farm & Ranch Legislation Update

AFA’s 2nd VP, Humphrey Banack, is a participant of one of the technical working groups reviewing the Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act. Banack is helping review existing requirements and exceptions for the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Code. The working group has met several times since June 2016.

afa-humphrey-banack-farm-safety

AFA’s 2nd VP, Humphrey Banack

“Overall, our group is looking at health-specific parts of the Code and whether or not these aspects should apply to farms and ranches, with or without modifications,” says Banack. “We are also sharing ideas about training and support for the agriculture community to successfully implement the OHS practices.”

Banack says some examples of areas being reviewed include worker competencies, emergency preparedness, hazard assessment, first aid, ventilation systems, fixed and portable ladders, plus other practical modifications to legacy buildings and equipment.

“Ultimately, it’s about making sure there is a safe working environment while also ensuring that these regulations allow businesses to operate profitably,” notes Banack.

With gratitude, we thank our corporate partner, FCC

fcc-logo

This profile features the partnership that Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) has with Farm Credit Canada (FCC). We’re proud to team up with this dynamic group that does so much for agriculture in Canada!
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Farm Credit Canada (FCC) is an important player in our country’s agriculture industry. As Canada’s top agricultural lender, FCC plays a vital role in supporting and strengthening our industry’s agribusinesses: from primary producers to companies that specialize in agri-food products.

FCC is a financially self-sustaining federal Crown corporation, reporting to Parliament through the federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. As an organization, FCC focuses on efforts that support Canadian agriculture, and give back to communities across Canada. They have over 1,700 employees in 100 offices throughout rural Canada.

FCC serves agriculture businesses in a wide variety of ways, helping producers and agribusinesses succeed by offering the following core services:

• Financing and Insurance: for primary producers, agribusinesses and young farmers
• Ag Knowledge: news articles and events to help producers manage production, marketing, human resources, technology, finances, business planning, and more
• Resources and Tools: innovative accounting and farm management software, calculators and specialized training
• Community Support: 4-H support, community funding, food bank drives and other partnerships

Beyond offering tailored products for agriculture, FCC staff are committed to sharing their expertise and knowledge with others in the industry. Each year, a representative from FCC attends our AFA Annual General Meeting to bring the latest advancements and outlooks to AFA members who attend our event.

In January 2016, we heard from Rob Schmeichel, FCC’s District Director from Edmonton, Alberta. Rob spoke passionately about the importance of telling agriculture’s story and being an agricultural advocate in today’s world with consumers so focussed on transparency and social license. All in attendance appreciated his enthusiasm, and his important message.

“In the years that AFA has partnered with FCC, we’ve admired their collaborative approach to business and the many ways they support agriculture across the country,” says AFA President Lynn Jacobson. “AFA and FCC personnel connect on a very deep level because we all share such a strong passion for agriculture. It’s a very rewarding partnership and we’re grateful for their friendship.”

Insurance tips to help you avoid risks on the farm this summer

The Co-operators is an AFA corporate partner and has many different types of farm insurance specifically designed for our agriculture sector. That includes property, contents, machinery, livestock, producer, hobby farms, accident insurance and more.

Did you know that being an AFA member also gives you exclusive access to coverage and savings on a variety of insurance products from The Co-operators? Remember to tell your agent you are an AFA member to get your discount!

These seasonal tips from The Co-operators will help prevent problems on your farm.

Drought conditions may increase hazards on your property

By summer 2015, many areas in Alberta have seen the driest conditions in 50 years. For farms with organic materials like hay and feed, plus large mechanical equipment, dry weather can mean additional potential fire hazards on the farm.

  • Keep the yard clear of brush and other flammable debris as sparks from machinery or stray cigarettes can turn litter into kindling. Keep flammable items away from heat sources.
  • Never discard smoking materials on the ground or in plant pots. Improperly extinguished smoking materials can smoulder undetected for days before igniting a fire.
  • Proper airflow and ventilation in buildings helps disperse flammable chemical vapours, silo gases and other hazardous by-products.
  • Maintain electrical equipment and keep wires safely enclosed in metal or PVC pipes to protect them from exposure to weather and animals.
  • Refuel equipment outdoors, away from open flames and as far from buildings as possible, to allow harmful vapours to dissipate.
  • Regularly inspect and maintain portable fire extinguishers. Keep extinguishers easy to find in each farm building, especially near mechanical equipment and storage areas that contain flammable materials.
  • Never leave portable heating units unattended, and avoid using heat lamps, solar lamps, trouble lights or heated watering bowls in your pets’ outdoor home (e.g., dog house). Portable electrical heating systems or temporary installations commonly contribute to fires.

When you’re away, keep your property safe

With the summer season here, extra steps may be needed to keep your home or cottage secure, and your property safe.

If you are planning to leave your house or vacation property unattended for stretches of time, call your insurance company to find out if they have a time limit for occupancy absences. Most insurance companies specify the time your property can be unoccupied and still benefit from insurance protection. You may need to have someone check the property every few days or shut off your water supply.

Next, leave your property with that ‘lived-in’ look to help deter vandals. These steps will help make your home or property look lived-in while you are away:

  • keep window coverings closed
  • put interior lights on timers
  • if applicable, have mail collected at least every 72 hours
  • have someone shovel snow or plow roads in the winter, or cut lawns or trim bushes in the summer

Remember, if you have a cottage or seasonal property, you may require a different policy for coverage. These Co-operators seasonal policies offer many kinds of coverage to suit your needs.

For more home insurance tips and information, visit The Co-operators’ Answer Centre or contact a local Co-operators financial advisor.