Farm organizations seeking producer input on seed royalties

Seed royalty survey SM graphic 3Western Canadian farm organizations want to hear from Canadian producers on proposed changes to seed royalty structures for cereal crops. A new online survey launched today to get their input.

Over the past year, AFA has worked closely with general farm organizations including Manitoba’s Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP), Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS) and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) to review the existing models proposed by the government.

Upon review of the models presented to date, AFA and other farm organizations feel there are several issues not addressed in the current proposals. In farm organization meetings, an area of significant antagonism for producers has been for proposed royalties on farmer-saved seed.

Although Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency held a series of public meetings this past winter to gauge feedback on the two proposed models, the government consultation process is currently on hold.

“The creation of a new seed royalty model for cereal crops will mean significant changes for producers when it comes to the issue of farmer-saved seed. Further exploration and consultation is absolutely critical to ensure that the interests of Canadian producers are reflected in any resulting model.”

– Lynn Jacobson, AFA President.

Online survey to capture farm producer input before government consultations

AFA, KAP and APAS want to hear from a greater number of farm producers on the proposed changes before the government consultations resume later this year. Producers can make their voice heard by taking a few minutes to complete the online survey here:

https://www.seedroyaltysurvey.com/

“Producers certainly weren’t satisfied with the level of engagement and consultation that went into the development of the two models currently under consideration,” said Todd Lewis, APAS President. “We want to make sure that producers stay on top of these discussions and have their voice heard throughout the process.”

In June, APAS, KAP and AFA presidents, board members and staff met in Regina for an in-depth discussion on cereal seed royalties. They explored a model that addresses several principles believed to be fundamental to any approved model, to ensure it reflects the interests of Canadian producers.

These principles, which received near unanimous support from farmer delegates across Canada, require that any value creation model must achieve the following outcomes:

  • Maintain and enhance public research, development and finishing of new varieties;
  • Preserve or enhance current public funding;
  • Be transparent with producer involvement;
  • Maintain the privilege of farmer-saved seed;
  • Incorporate systems that are administered in a fair and equitable manner; and
  • Ensure producers can remain competitive in the world marketplace.

Our analysis of the existing proposals for seed models that utilize a trailing royalty and/or an end point royalty shows that these current proposals fall short of meeting the principles outlined above.

That’s why our prairie farm organizations are reaching out to farmers to see what they think.

More input sought from producers

It’s the belief of AFA and our prairie farm organization colleagues that anything that has such a substantial impact on farmers must engage farmers in the process before the creation and approval of a new model.

With the current government consultation process on hold, we’re making it easy for farm producers to have their voice heard by taking the online survey at: https://www.seedroyaltysurvey.com/

“It is crucial that we hear from farmers and producers on the two new proposed models, because consultation with those who are directly affected ultimately leads to better decision making,” Bill Campbell, president of Keystone Agricultural Producers said. “Our hope is that producers will take the time to get involved in this process and ensure their needs are met under a new royalty structure.”

For more information, read our AFA news release here.

A prosperous agriculture industry benefits us all

vegetables-pixabystockCanadians live in a country where local food is plentiful, the food quality is outstanding and there is a strong agricultural community working to ensure our food is accessible and abundant.

In addition, the Canadian agricultural industry is a huge engine for growth and prosperity for our country and our citizens. This kind of prosperity doesn’t just happen by chance. It comes about through hard-working farm and ranch owners, a strong agricultural workforce, and an industry committed to efficiency, technology and a robust national food policy.

To highlight the many benefits of agriculture to the lives of Canadians and the economy, the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) is spearheading an advocacy campaign Producing Prosperity in Canada. This initiative is supported by Canada’s provincial general farm organizations, like AFA, who work to provide a unified voice and advocate for Canadian farmers at all levels of government.

General farm organizations are non-partisan and represent producers of all commodities. These farm families operate farms and ranches from coast-to-coast producing blueberries, beef, chicken, pork, wheat, barley, canola, chickpeas, lentils, honey, tomatoes, potatoes, cucumbers, corn, sugar beets and so much more.

The goal of the Producing Prosperity in Canada campaign is to identify Canadian agriculture as a sector that benefits all of Canada and to show that investments made in agriculture have far-reaching impacts in economic growth, food security and environmental stewardship. Here are just a few ways agriculture contributes, and why investments in this industry will be key for a prosperous future.

Economic growth

Canadian agriculture is a significant employer of skilled labour, with the agriculture and agri-food sectors accounting for one in eight jobs in 2014 and employing around 2.3 million people. Agriculture drives our national economy through job opportunities, tax revenues and rural economic development. In 2016 alone, Canada’s value exports in this sector totaled $56 billion and generated nearly $112 billion, or 6.7% of Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP).

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Food security

Canadians enjoy one of the most diverse offerings of food and value-added products in the world. This post from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada calls agriculture “a colossal contributor to the lives of all Canadians”. Along with feeding Canadians, our country’s agricultural products, foods and beverages can be found around the globe, as shown here.

Our Canadian food system is known for its safe, high-quality food, produced in an efficient and affordable manner. Canadians spend less than most other countries on groceries and have an amazing variety of locally and nationally grown foods at their fingertips.

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Environmental stewardship

Agricultural lands contribute to our environment in many ways from fresh water and clean air, to erosion control and climate regulation. Rural farms are also a haven for wildlife and contribute to diverse habitats such as prairie grasslands, riparian areas and wetlands.

The many advances in agricultural land management practices over the last three decades – and improvements to modern farm equipment – have contributed to considerable gains in soil quality and the reduction of carbon emissions.

Government representatives, academics and the industry continue to work together to invest in plant science, research and technologies that help farmers grow more crops on less land, while reducing their carbon footprint. Advancements in technology help improve water use efficiency, harness solar and wind power and create new seed varieties that are resistant to drought, diseases and other pests.

duck-pixabystockHow you can help

CFA has created a website of resources, including videos, infographics and a pledge form to help spread the word about Producing Prosperity in Canada. Please feel free to use the resources to help build awareness and spread the word on this important topic. https://producingprosperitycanada.ca/

“The three pillars of economic growth, food security and environmental stewardship are the building blocks of a prosperous future for us all,” says Lynn Jacobson, AFA President. “We look forward to working with CFA and our partner farm organizations to meet with political representatives and candidates to remind them of the importance of agriculture as we move towards a federal election.”

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From grain transportation to sustainable agriculture. What we’re working on today.

There was no shortage of issues, opportunities and challenges to discuss recently at the half-year mark in our year, and Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) shared these discussions with farmers at our 2018 Summer Meeting.

2018 has been a year of change in agriculture, with some issues continuing to squeeze producers – like grain transportation – and others new on the horizon, like environmental farm plans.

In late-June 2018, AFA Members and others interested in agricultural policy gathered in Camrose, Alberta to participate in discussions about emerging issues that will affect farmers in the coming year. Producer meetings are just one of the ways AFA’s Board stays in touch with what’s important to Alberta farmers.

Transportation and seed

iStock_000019270898medAFA President Lynn Jacobson, who continues to lead the organization in advocating on issues that matter to farmers, says grain transportation is one issue AFA has advocated on for years and is continuing to watch.

“At this point, it doesn’t look like the recent legislation that was passed will put us on equal footing with other industries,” he explains. “The railway still has the ability to ration and prioritize grain shipments. So, that’s an issue we are following very closely as we go forward.”

Another long-time issue for AFA discussed at the Summer Meeting is plant breeders’ rights. It’s a complex issue that has developed from national changes to plant breeders’ rights in 2015. The part of the topic that AFA is looking at is around farm-saved seed and royalty options.

“There doesn’t seem to be consensus in the agriculture community about where to go with it,” notes Jacobson. “We need a lot more discussion with producers if the government is going to change regulations, and the seed sector and commodity groups are going to have to be communicating more about it, too.”

Sustainability in agriculture

During the panel discussion on sustainable agriculture at the AFA Summer Meeting, Jacobson said attendees appreciated learning more about what the marketplace and customers are now demanding from Canadian producers. He says as a result, AFA has become more involved in the process of Environmental Farm Plans (EFP). This is a new area of investigation for AFA, and Jacobson is well positioned in the industry with his board position on a national EFP group.

“As we go down the road of sustainability and consumers and customers want to know what’s in their food and how it has been raised, EFPs are going to be more important,” Jacobson says. “It could get to the point that if you haven’t done an EFP and kept certain records, you may not be able to sell agricultural products to certain segments.”

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What’s on the horizon?

Jacobson will join agricultural groups from across Canada at the Canadian Federation of Agriculture ‘Lobby Day 2018’ in Ottawa on October 30. The purpose of the event is to have representatives from across the country share a unified perspective on Canadian agricultural priorities by meeting with MPs and senators from all parties.

These are just a few of the key areas that the AFA Board and Executive is working on to address concerns and opportunities in the agricultural sector. It’s a mission that requires perseverance and political effort, and one that Jacobson feels passionate about.

“It’s important that the voice of the producer is heard,” says Jacobson. “Bringing the views of Alberta farmers to all levels of government is how change happens.”

If you want to know more about AFA and its activities, or for information on becoming an AFA member or our upcoming annual general meeting, visit our website at www.afaonline.ca.

 

AFA Summer Meeting: a chance to discuss challenges and opportunities in agriculture

The Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) will hold their 2018 Summer Meeting on June 26 and 27, 2018 in Camrose, Alberta.

AFA Members – and those interested in agricultural policy – are invited to attend the working session on June 26 to participate in discussions about the emerging issues that will most affect farmers in the coming year. There will also be a presentation on sustainable agriculture.

AFA AGM- Farm Meeting2AFA Director Humphrey Banack says he always looks forward to challenging debate and discussion when those passionate about agriculture get together.

“During the AGM, we gather with producers to debate and discuss top issues in agriculture, then use those policy directions to draw the future of agriculture forward,” says Banack. “The June Summer Meeting is an important way to check in on how we’re doing for the year and discuss emerging issues that have developed since January.”

After the day of discussions on June 26, the meeting will conclude with a networking barbeque to give those in attendance an opportunity to connect with each other and share good food, good company and discuss issues in agriculture in a more informal way.

Here’s the agenda for the Tuesday, June 26, 2018 meeting:

10 am – noon:  Issue Update & Policy Development: What AFA has been up to this year

Noon: Lunch at Camrose Resort Casino

1 – 3 pm: Discussion on the top emerging issues facing our industry in the coming year

3 – 3:15 pm: Break

3:15 – 4:30 pm: Sustainable Agriculture Panel

4:30 – 5 pm: Issue/Debate Wrap Up

5:30 pm: Steak BBQ at the Park Pavilion, Camrose Exhibition Trail RV Park

On Wednesday, June 27, AFA will hold their regularly-scheduled board meeting, of which AFA Regional Directors and former AFA board members are welcome to attend.

Please RSVP for this event so we can assess attendance and plan for our barbeque. Contact AFA’s Executive Director Shannon Scofield by email at shannon.scofield@afaonline.ca, or call us toll-free at 1-855-789-9151 or contact the AFA Director in your area.

afa-humphrey-banack-farm-safetyHumphrey Banack, who farms near Camrose, Alberta, reminds producers that it’s never been more important to speak up and drive agricultural policy decisions. He stresses that meetings like this are a direct channel for producers to let their voice be heard.

“At AFA, our people are working for a stronger industry for all,” says Banack. “Past discussions like this have laid the foundation for some significant changes in agriculture. It’s great to know you can have such an impact at a grassroots level.”

Your chance to spend some time on the farm this summer

AFA-Banack Open Farm Days Tent

Open Farm Days visitors learn about, and see, the grains grown on the Banack farm.

Consumers continue to be tremendously interested in how their food is grown. Getting farm producers and consumers together is one of the goals of Alberta’s Open Farm Days. This annual event provides an important connection for rural producers and their urban neighbours.

Open Farm Days also continues to be a popular event for farm producers, with a 28% increase in host farm participation when compared to last year. For 2016, a total of 90 host farms will provide real-world farm experiences for visitors on Sunday, August 21.

Once again, our Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) Vice President, Humphrey Banack and his family will be participating as a host farm. Humphrey and wife Terry Banack will welcome visitors to their Camrose-area homestead and will provide information and demonstrations for those who attend.

“Open Farm Days is a very important event in Alberta,” says Humphrey Banack. “People come with questions and a real open interest in agriculture. Traceability and social license are hot topics for today’s consumer, and Open Farm Days allows us to have that important conversation with members of the public.”

8-AFA-Banack Open Farm DaysHumphrey and Terry say that Open Farm Days lets them provide visitors with a ‘mini-adventure’ with a hands-on look at how food is produced nearby in Alberta communities. This year, the Banacks hope to take visitors out harvesting and send them home with a bag of peas straight from the field that they can use in recipes at home. Check out this video for more information.

Host farms that offer Open Farm DaysFarm Experiences” showcase a wide range of farm businesses including honey and berry farms, petting zoos, flower farms, plus more traditional agricultural enterprises like livestock, crop and vegetable farms.

Open Farm Days also includes farm-to-table “Culinary Experiences” taking place on August 20 and 21. These events feature local chefs and producers that team up to provide unique field dinners, brewery tasting tours, cowboy gatherings and barbecues. Most of these events require ticket purchases in advance. Information can be found at http://www.albertafarmdays.com/.

“We understand how important it is to connect with the consumers of our product,” Banack says. “Open Farm Days gives us the opportunity to allow visitors to see exactly what we do, where we fit into their food system and how we are part of what they put on their tables everyday.”

This AFA video taken during Alberta’s 2015 Open Farm Days event on the Banack Homestead shows what visitors can expect from a farm visit.

We encourage you to make this fun event part of your summer plans!

AFA members take their business on the road

We love to give a shout out to our AFA members! Here’s a great story on what can happen when you are willing to look at things in a different light. Congratulations to the Morris family on the new addition to their business!

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Arnie and Shirley Morris have been successful quail egg producers for the last three decades. From their Ardrossan, Alberta farm, they supply western Canadian retailers with about 10,000 of these delicate eggs each day.

When the opportunity to sell quail meat arose, they knew ramping up their production would be no problem. Finding a processing facility for the tiny birds was another matter.

Quails raised by the Morris family

Quails raised by the Morris family

“Processing plants don’t really have the equipment to handle small birds,” says Shirley Morris. “We made so many calls, and just couldn’t find a plant to do it. We knew we weren’t the only producers looking for this, and that there was demand for it.”

Where others saw closed doors, the Morris family saw potential. They decided to buy a custom mobile processing plant and became quail processors themselves. Inside the 28-ft. trailer, they can process quails, game birds and chickens plus create packaged meat for consumers.

Inside the Morris family mobile processing plant trailer

Inside the Morris family mobile processing plant trailer

“For other farmers that raise chickens or pheasants, we’ll bring the processor to them,” Shirley says.  “It can also be a way to bring this great-tasting, high-quality meat to chefs and restaurants.”

As Shirley explains, the mobile plant gives them a unique way to take advantage of new markets, like the farm-to-table movement. They can process up to 600 birds a day, plus vacuum-seal the meat and sell it either fresh or frozen.

Fresh Bry-Conn Quail (10 pack)

Fresh Bry-Conn Quail (10 pack)

Growing this side of their farm business has not been all smooth sailing, but Shirley notes they have some terrific support both on and off the farm. Their children are now involved in the processing business.

The Morris family also works closely with provincial meat inspectors to ensure the product meets the highest quality standards plus regulations for food safety, packaging and labelling. Shirley also credits Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA) and Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA) staff as being instrumental in helping get this venture off the ground.

“This was a new area for us, so we had a lot of questions,” says Shirley. “AFA staff spent so much time helping us find the information we needed. We are so grateful for everyone’s help. It’s great to see what you can do with just 30 acres.”

The Morris family farm was also recently featured in The Western Producer. Click here to see the story and a video tour of the trailer!

CleanFARMS Obsolete Pick Up

Ever wondered if there is an environmentally-responsible way to dispose of old or unwanted agricultural products in Alberta?

Now there is! The Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) is working with CropLife Canada/CleanFARMS to collect unwanted, obsolete and expired agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications from Alberta’s agri-business and equine industries.

This program is offered for free to the province’s farmers, ranchers and producers. Products accepted at the collection sites include:

  • Obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides (identified with a Pest Control Product number on the label).
  • Livestock medications that are used by primary producers in the rearing of animals in an agricultural context (identified with a DIN number, Serial Number or Pest Control Product number on the label). Needles not accepted.

For 2015, the collection will take place from Monday, October 26 through Friday, October 30 at 20 different sites across southern Alberta. Once obsolete materials are dropped off at a designated collection site, the products are then transported to a high-temperature incineration facility where they are safely disposed of.

This poster from CleanFARMS shows the collection sites, but you can also view this information online.

6270-CleanFARMS Obsolete Pesticides Poster (AB)_WEB-1

For producers outside southern Alberta, the collection program will be offered in the northern half of Alberta at approximately 20 ag-retail locations in the fall of 2016. The obsolete collection program is typically delivered in each region of the country every three years.

CleanFARMS is a Canadian not-for-profit organization that is committed to environmental responsibility through the proper management of agricultural waste. We all want safe, healthy and sustainable environments. The CleanFARMS programs help environmentally-conscious farmers, ranchers and producers manage the waste generated by their rural-based businesses.

The last time the obsolete collection program was delivered in Alberta in 2012 and 2013 a total of 96,381 kgs of obsolete pesticide were collected. Since the program was first launched in 1998, CropLife Canada/CleanFARMS have collected over 300,000 kgs of obsolete pesticide. 2015 marks the first time that livestock/equine medications will be collected as part of the CleanFARMS program in Alberta.

For more information on the program or the collection campaign, visit the CleanFARMS website at http://www.cleanfarms.ca.